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Keep on Keeping On: Working Moms and Stay at Home Moms

Everybody has an opinion about working moms and stay at home moms.

The topic has been written about as much as breastfeeding versus formula, cloth versus regular diapers, organic food versus processed food.

Then I saw an article that really got me fired up.

A couple months ago, Harvard Business School performed a study finding working moms have more successful daughters and more caring sons than stay at home moms.  I saw the article plastered all over my social media news feeds and some friends encouraged me to share it on my blog’s Facebook page, as I customarily post newsworthy stories on days I’m not promoting my own blog.

No way.

Firstly, I don’t know the testing Harvard used to come up with its “findings,” but the study, and publicity of the outcome, resulted in the continued polarization of working moms and stay at home moms.

Aren’t we all in this together?

Truth be told, if one of my stay at home mom friends shared a story about how stay at home moms had more successful children than working moms, I’d think she was a jerk.

You know what, Harvard? You can trash your findings.

Whether a mother works outside the home or doesn’t will not, by itself, give a child an “edge” on success. Here’s what will:

Spending Quality Time With Your Children. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they spend quality time with them. Asking about their day and actively listening to the stories that follow. Wanting to know about what they learned at school. Helping them do their homework. Telling jokes. Reading books. Watching them explore the world. Engaging in hobbies together.

Monitoring Who Their Friends Are. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they pay attention to who their friends are. It’s true that one bad apple can spoil the whole bunch. In my life, I’ve seen children with huge potential and abundant talents get sucked into a black vortex when their parents didn’t take the time to know who their friends were. Parents who are allowing their children to spend time with other kids who are habitually engaging in illegal activities (see: underage smoking and drinking), skipping school, or who are sexually promiscuous shouldn’t be surprised if their child is doing the same things.

Letting Them Make Mistakes. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they allow them to make mistakes so they can learn from them. You want to wait until the eleventh hour to make your science fair project? Ok, but don’t ask me to help and don’t get upset when you earn a bad grade and, as a result, can’t participate in a school-sponsored sports team.

Sometimes small mistakes lead to big opportunities for growth. Just ask Bill Gates about the failure of his first company, Traf-O-Data.

Being a Good Example. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they are good examples themselves. As people, we are imperfect. I’ve done things in my youth that I’m not proud of, and that I will likely never admit to my children until they are grown (if ever). Now that I’m a parent, I know my kids are always watching. They hear what my husband and I say. They watch what we do. They listen to what we are listening to. And while there have been times when I’ve completely lost my cool, I overall try to set a good example.

And hope they forget about the times I lost my cool.

Holding Them Accountable. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they hold them accountable for their actions. A bad report card means being grounded until the grades improve. Acting disrespectful to peers and adults will have consequences.

When I was in middle school, my math teacher called my mom at work to tell her I was more concerned about socializing in class than I was about learning algebra. Shocking. When I got home, I was immediately sent to my room. There was no “asking for my side of the story” or giving me the benefit of the doubt. Nowadays, parents are more likely to blame the authority figure than they are to question their own children. This can lead to a long term loss of accountability.

Cultivating Their Authentic Passions. Parents are more likely to have successful children when they focus on what their children want to do instead of what they want them to do. My daughters don’t want to be doctors, lawyers, or accountants when they grow up? Instead, they want to be artists? That’s cool. I’ll enroll them in creative classes that will provide them the educational background essential to promote their artistic talents. Heck, maybe they can earn an MBA while they’re at it so they can own an art studio as well.

And you know what? A parent can do all of these things and still have the wheels come off. Go figure.

Regardless, Harvard Business School needs to lay off the mom guilt.

As a mom, the decision to stay at home or work is a choice. Why are we criticizing other women’s choices?

Absent criminal conduct, I generally don’t care how other mothers choose to raise their children.

Hear me out. I know my emotional limitations, and I lack the mental stamina required to stay at home all day with two very young children. I’ll likely feel differently when my girls, ages 1 and 3, are a few years older, but that’s how I feel now. My choice to work full time is a decision that is best for my family, the same way another mom’s choice to stay home is a decision that is best for her family.

Let’s not forget that some women don’t have a choice of working or staying home. Some women’s’ high earning potential requires them to work. With the rising cost of child care, some women simply cannot afford to work outside the home.

Stay at Home Moms: you’re doing a great job. Working Moms: so are you.

Let’s all just keep on keeping on.

JenJennifer Burby is a full time attorney at the Tampa office of a large Florida law firm. She is the blogger at The Champagne Supernova, and has received national acclaim as a writer for The Today Show blog and is routinely featured in The Huffington Post. When she’s not cranking out billable hours or writing, Jennifer enjoys spending time with her husband and two daughters.

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